REUSING PAINT ROLLERS AND 9 OTHER GREEN TIPS

Going green is most likely becoming a focus for you and your customers. Many eco-friendly practices, like reusing tools and materials, are important considerations for the environment and for your painting business. Fortunately, that can be a win-win all around.

Paintbrush dipped in blue paint
1

Get 6 Months out of that Brush

Paintbrush dipped in blue paint
Invest in a quality brush—it will last longer with proper care. When not using the brush, keep it covered—even if breaking for lunch. Clean immediately after use and store it properly.
A wood surface being painted in a teal color
2

Donate Your Leftover Paint

A wood surface being painted in a teal color
Charitable development organizations like Habitat for Humanity® and Global Paint For Charity® often take leftover paint from contractors, saving you from having to store it. Generally, you’ll receive a tax deduction for the value of paint, along with the satisfaction of knowing your surplus is being put to good use.
Benjamin Moore 5-gallon paint bucket sitting next to a roller cover and tray
3

Rethink Your 5-Gallon Buckets

Benjamin Moore 5-gallon paint bucket sitting next to a roller cover and tray
Depending on the paint, most buckets can be washed out and reused for a long time. If you can’t reuse one for paint, try putting paint supplies or other tools in the bucket—it’s an easy and cost-efficient storage solution.
Contractor cleaning painted trim with cloth rags
4

Clean Up with Cloth Rags

Contractor cleaning painted trim with cloth rags
Make the greener choice to use cloth rags instead of going through roll after roll of paper towels. Wash out rags throughout the day and after a job, or simply let them dry and reuse as often as possible.
A contractor using a canvas drop cloth on an exterior paint job
5

Consider Canvas Drop Cloths vs. Plastic

A contractor using a canvas drop cloth on an exterior paint job
Canvas drop cloths are reusable, they come in a range of sizes, and their heavy weight means they stay put, which is less of a safety hazard. Plastic drop cloths need to be taped down, resulting in more time, more money and more waste.
A wooden stir stick in a yellow can of paint
6

Reuse Wooden Stir Sticks

A wooden stir stick in a yellow can of paint
Most painters do this already, but it’s an eco-friendly reminder to reuse wooden stir sticks from project to project. Scrape off the paint and properly clean and dry them.
A can of Benjamin Moore® ben® paint
7

Know Your VOCs

A can of Benjamin Moore® ben® paint
Homeowners are starting to request low VOC paint and several states offer credits and tax benefits to certain building owners and developers for using them. Benjamin Moore has many low and zero-VOC paints that are eligible for LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) standards. Knowing which paints meet these standards can go a long way in pleasing a homeowner and be wallet-friendly come tax time. See our article, Paint VOCs.
Primer being applied with a paintbrush
8

Consider Your Paint Choices

Primer being applied with a paintbrush
Waterborne alkyd paints are popular because they provide a smooth and hard finish, comparable to traditional oils, but without having to use harsh solvents for clean-up. We recommend ADVANCE® Interior Paint and Fresh Start® Premium Primer.
A contractor purchasing Benjamin Moore® paint in bulk
9

Buy in Bulk

A contractor purchasing Benjamin Moore® paint in bulk
Stock up on common trim paints and primers—typically the white shades. Water-based paints have a long shelf life, often lasting up to two years. Have too much? Pour some into a quart can for your clients to use for touch-ups. Empty quart cans are available at most paint stores.
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